In war the most deeply considered plans have no significance and that all depends on the way unexpected movements of the enemythat cannot be foreseenare met, and on how and by whom the whole matter is handled


Quotation from novel "War and Peace" (1863 - 1869) by russian writer Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), Book 9, chapter IX (Translators: Louise and Aylmer Maude). Author writes about Prince Andrew:

"During the first four days, while no duties were required of him, Prince Andrew rode round the whole fortified camp and, by the aid of his own knowledge and by talks with experts, tried to form a definite opinion about it. But the question whether the camp was advantageous or disadvantageous remained for him undecided. Already from his military experience and what he had seen in the Austrian campaign, he had come to the conclusion that in war the most deeply considered plans have no significance and that all depends on the way unexpected movements of the enemythat cannot be foreseenare met, and on how and by whom the whole matter is handled. To clear up this last point for himself, Prince Andrew, utilizing his position and acquaintances, tried to fathom the character of the control of the army and of the men and parties engaged in it, and he deduced for himself the following of the state of affairs.".

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